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shows you how different things were as sandy said. that's what jackie kennedy was so sensitive to. when she did her famous tv tour of the white house, she said i'm trying to change the way the preside presidency is seen by the world. that's why i'm restoring the white house, why welcoming ceremonies on the grounds, "air force one" under eisenhower. she was so sensitive to the impact she could have if this was a ceremony that looked like lincoln's funeral, elevate jfk to the level of lincoln and replace those sordid images from dallas. >> sander, you referred to the fact it was john kennedy's third birthday. that image when he came down and you see now, showing the footage of jackie kennedy leaning down and suggesting to him that he salute his father as the coffin was passing. the back story to that, head of her secret service detail, she had asked the detail to teach him how to salute in advance of going to arlington for veterans day, which he did for his dad. he kept using his left hand inappropriately not the right-hand. it was during the funeral at st. chris matthews, sander, a marin
was not always the easiest of relationships, but how did he treat the departing first family and jackie kennedy? >> very well and mrs. kennedy talked about how grateful she was for president johnson. she would have to say president johnson unlike the president's brother, who she called a couple of hours across -- after the assassination -- president johnson -- the very easily to calling him mr. president. but she was very grateful to president johnson, that they were so grateful to her, and they let her stay in the white house until december 6. she was able to stay there with her children until she got the sense of where she was going to go. and in the carnage in dallas, she lost her husband, her home and her job. she had no place to go until the home was open in georgetown. caroline was going to nursery school and kindergarten. she was very grateful to the president for that. >> you have listened to a lot of jacqueline kennedy -- she sounds so in control of herself, 10 days after the assassination and going to the funeral, how do we understand her and her psyche issues. >> you will find someon
talk about jackie kennedy. >> thank you. life in the philippines. the philippines and panama, both were extremely uncomfortable for her. particularly in panama it was primitive. the philippines, where they lived was much more comfortable. they had a nice apartment. it was air-conditioned. she had a difficult time in terms of the environment. she did not do well in the heat. there were times when she suffered some health problems. >> there were a number of generals elected to the white house. how does the world prepare the first couple for life in the white house? >> with ike there were all kinds of executive and administrative decisions he was used to making, but for mamie, the entertaining of heads of state while he was commander of nato, according to her own testimony was something that really prepared her for entertaining at the white house. she knew how to do it. she was confident about doing it. she actually loved that part of the role. >> hi, jeffrey, you are on. >> my question was about how politically involved she was before she was in the white house. the general was not politi
fascinated by jackie kennedy. >> i didn't think it was possible to write a biography about her that would be news worthy. because th at the time i tried o do it there was 43 books written on her. i infe interviewed a lot of peoe close to the family and close to mrs. onassis which she was at the time i wrote it. i believe writing an unauthorized biography. unauthorized does not mean untrue. it means you are doing it without the subject's cooperation or approval. would you like to do one with the subject's cooperation? >> no. >> really. >> because you give up editorial control. , if you arso if you are writint jacqueline kennedy onassis, of course i wouldn't be able to talk about the president's womanizing or the things that really affected their marriage. primarily not so much the womanizing, although she go not know about it and she tolerated. >> it was the awful health problems that dogged jfk for so much of his life. i don't think anybody realizes all of the sicknesses and the botched surgeries and the awful diagnosises that he had. and that really was a burden. and she would not have a
's been shot. oswald has been shot. >> lee oswald -- >> schieffer: joining us now jackie kennedy's secret service agent, clint hill, author of the new book "five days in november" mr. hill, thank you so much for being with us. when that happened, when jack ruby shot lee harvey oswald that sunday you were already back in washington, because president johnson, mrs. kennedy all had gone back on air force one. when you got back to washington, what did the secret service, what was your reaction to hearing that lee harvey oswald had been killed? >> we didn't find that out until somewhat later that day because just as he was being killed we were in the process of accompanying mrs. kennedy and the children and the president, johnson, taking the president's body up to the u.s. capital. some time later, then we were found out this had happened because we really wanted to interrogate him. wanted to find out why. wanted to see what his motivation was. we never had that chance. >> schieffer: you know, we now know especially through the reporting of bill shennan it had been well-known that lee harvey
jackie? >> absolutely fascinated by jacqueline kennedy onassis. absolutely fascinated by. there had already been 43 books written on her but i interviewed a lot of people close to the family, close to mrs. onassis, which she was at the time that i wrote it. and i really believe in writing what i call an unauthorized biography. now unauthorized does not mean untrue, it means you're doing it without the subject's cooperation or approval. >> would you like to do it with the subject's cooperation? >> no. >> really? >> because -- >> yeah? >> because -- you give up editorial control. so if you are writing about jacqueline kennedy onassis, of course i was -- i wouldn't be able to talk about the president's womanizing, or the things that really affected their marriage. primarily not so much the womanizing although she did know about it and she tolerated it, it was the awful health problems that dogged jfk for so much of his life. i don't think anybody really realizes all the sicknesses, all the botched surgeries, all the awful diagnoses that he had. and that really was a better. and she wou
is ferocious about the protection of her two children as was jackie kennedy. she too is too fashion plate and cares very, very much about clothes and how she looks, and the image she presents, as did jackie kennedy. president obama is as gifted as kennedy was intellectually, they were both fine orators, lots of teeth, lots of prettiness. >> you have covered so much. how do you decide who you want to write about? >> i only choose people who have really left a footprint on our landscape. i choose people who are very much alive, who have influenced our culture in some way, politically or socially, and have had ims men's power over us in that sense. -- immense power, over us in that sense. everyone i have chosen for a biography i have been i guess in awe of, a little bit, and have wanted to go behind the curtain of that public image to find out what they are really like. it was kennedy himself who said, the thing that makes biography so interesting and so fascinating the is the search to find out, what's he really like? >> going behind the curtain has made you face some serious criticism. nan
of this nation, it was jackie kennedy who took the lead. >> she was absolutely determined that the often sordid and brutal images from dallas be supplanted by images that would put her husband historically on a level with abraham lincoln. >> reporter: so the east room was draped in black, just as it had been for lincoln. the flag-covered casket was covered on a horse drawn caisson. the muffled drums and a riderless horse in the procession. >> she has never been less than perfect. more than any other one person it was she who raised the level of it all from savage insanity up to the level of solemn grandeur. >> reporter: the first lady had no choice but to share her private grief. >> she took her ring from her finger and placed it in his hands. >> reporter: a personal moment at the hospital after kennedy was pronounced dead became the refrain in his eulogy. but perhaps the most enduring image of that day, a young boy saluting his father. the story behind that image? president kennedy had taken john john to arlington cemetery for veterans day. the kennedys were trying to teach him to salute. for
think jackie kennedy was the first lady that is part of a media strategy. role,xon did not play the the public role, that the white house wanted her to play. >> i think it goes further back. i think the republican party used her during the eisenhower, when she was second lady, and wanted to use this image of and pat as a young couple that mirrored america at the same time, two young children. the republican party actually helped to create the image of her as an ideal how to that house life. when she was there, they could not stop it. it took on a life of its own. >> do you think they were doing the same thing with maniac oh >> mimi was so much older. i think pat had to fill in with many. many was more the grandmother. she was not making public appearances the way that pat was. they needed pat to be a perfect housewife who could do all of these things at the same time. >> it is the flip of what we learned with lady bird johnson and jacqueline kennedy. jacqueline kennedy did not campaign very much later. the older and less glamorous was out on the campaign trail making a lot of ap
to go to this extreme with the media? >> no. the kennedy white house had thought a lot about jackie. the very fact that jaclyn kenny went to dallas, she was going to dallas because the president knew he needed her help in what was supposed to just the apolitical tour. this was not the first time. jaclyn kenny -- kennedy was the first. eleanor roosevelt thought about her public role, but she pushed that. she is unilaterally responsible for that. the roosevelt white house pushing her in front. i think jackie kennedy was the first lady that is part of a media strategy. pat nixon did not play the role, the public role, that the white house wanted her to play. >> i think it goes further back. i think the republican party used her during the eisenhower, when she was second lady, and wanted to use this image of and pat as a young couple that mirrored america at the same time, two young children. the republican party actually helped to create the image of her as an ideal how to that house life. when she was there, they could not stop it. it took on a life of its own. >> do you think they we
popular but she had a role to play, too. >> she would fill in for jackie kennedy many times. she was pregnant, she lost the baby, she was unwell, and there were a lot of things that she didn't want to do. mrs. johnson filled in. she knew the role well and she was a quintessential washington political wife. she had been on the scene since the 1930's and she knew it well. she had a cadre of other political wives that were extraordinary women. they all gathered around her. that also made that transition somewhat easier. >> we should say at the onset, one of the women who gathered around was your mother. can you talk about the friendship between your parents and the johnsons? >> my father was first elected to congress in 1940. he was 26 and my mother was 24. that was before world war ii. the rules were still there of calling. so you had to go calling, the supreme court on monday, the cabinet on tuesday, i am making up the days, but there was my mother, this 24-year-old girl, her first day of having to go calling. the horn honks outside and she goes running down and it is lady bird jo
that an unauthorized biography gives me a better chance. >> host: knowing what you know about jackie kennedy, john kennedy. if you had known that, would you vote for john kerry for president, again knowing what you know now? >> guest: knowing what i know now and knowing what i know now about richard nixon, yes, i would vote for john f. kennedy. not simply because my last name is kelley. that would not have been the reason. i would vote for john f. kennedy based on the speech he gave in june of 1963 when he talked about civil rights and he introduced civil rights legislation. i think that speech ennobled his presidency. and his presidency was flawed. the cuban missile crisis, the step up in vietnam. but what he said on civil rights to me was a shining moment. he taught about civil rights is a moral right, as something that's clear is the constitution and the soul of the scriptures. that night, after he gave that speech, his popularity went from 60% to 47% like that. ebbers was murdered that night. john f. kennedy went into the presidency as most presidents do, thinking foreign policy is going to be
. it was a very strange relationship. lou: jackie kennedy's influence, looking at the two pivotal women in this tale. her role as you see it. >> she created the image of john kennedy from the time they got married. she was the stage person and she said she wanted to be the art director of the 20th century, and she did it through him. she helped him with the imagery and the photography the perfect image and she made him a legend in the four days after dallas. her behavior was wonderful and moving and she was in the car and she was inches from his face on his head was blown off. she said oh, no -- he tried to reach for some ofhis brains in the skull in te back, she wasn't trying to escape. she thought the doctors would need this to fix them later. lou: reaching across the trunk lid tobring the brain matter back. >> yes, and he pushes her back into the car and she says, my god, i have my husbands brains all over me. lou: we are coming up on an amazing anniversary and i can't commend the book you too highly. it is end of days, on sale online at bookstores everywhere, certainly beginning tom
hill who is jackie kennedy's secret service agent. james: it is week 12 in the nfl. bill: and there's geno smith, looking to rebound from last week in tough conditions in baltimore against a good defense in that building. boomer: for baltimore it's going to be tough for rex ryan. shannon: j.j. watt -- bill: there's rex ryan. that's not j.j. watt.
to jackie kennedy about what he remembers from that day. >> she wanted to view the president. at one point shea turned to me and said, would you get me a pair of scissors? i ran to the usher's office and got a pair of scissors and gave them to her. i stood there and i could hear the click, click, click. i knew she was cutting a lock of his hair. >> today's ceremony at the eternal flame is at 2:00. >>> tdoctors in baltimore are working to keep a man alive after he was rescued from a home. he was trapped when the fire sparked in his home on cherriway in salisbury on the eastern shore. his caretaker who was next door at the time tried to get into the home but was overcome by the heavy smoke. firefighters were able to get to hitchcock who is in critical condition with severe burns. investigators are still looking for the cause of that fire. >>> well, this morning we're dealing with a cold blast. most of the region waking up to temperatures in the teens. take a look at the map here. news 4's melissa mollet is live in dupont circumstanle. >> reporter: it is absolutely brutal. i want to show you
woman at the time. >> jackie kennedy onassis was diagnosed with john hodgkins lympho lymphoma. on may 19 of that have year, she died at age 64. in the end, she rested alongside jfk at arlington national cemetery. at her funeral, cameras caught caroline saying her last goodbyes. followed by jfk jr. who tenderly touched the grave marker for his phat per .this echoed the farewell salute he gave in 1963. ♪ [ man ] adventure, it means taking chances. it means trying something new. [ woman ] just, that uncertainty of what's to come. [ man ] just kidding. ♪ can you please stop doing that? ♪ [ woman ] you walk outside in brooklyn, and it's cement and broken glass. and this is just like... the opposite of that. ♪ ♪ these rf a few of my favorite things ♪ >> julie andrews emortalized forever in the 1965 classic "the sound of music." and now a live presentation of the "sound of music" this time carrie underwood singing a few of her favorite things. and we have your exclusive look. ♪ rain drops on roses ♪ and whiskers on kittens >> something likdoe a deer a female deer ♪ ♪ rain a
witnessed jackie kennedy moving toward the dead president and removing the wedding ring from his finger and placing it on her hand and kissed them goodbye. then there was a historic confrontation in the trauma room between county medical examiner earl rose and the secret service over the custody of the remains of the president. he said i was in their way. i was face-to-face with the secret service agent roy keller and i was trying to explain to him that the texas law required a non-toxic to be performed in texas. and no one was in charge of the situation very an agent kellerman tried three tactics to have his way. he asserted his identity as representative of the secret service. he appealed for sympathy for mrs. kennedy and finally to use body language in an attempt to bully me. i was not looking at agent kellerman's gone, the guns were drawn. i was looking in his eyes and they were very intense. his eyes said that he meant to give the president's body back to washington. and in the wrong out silence of the parkland emergency room after president johnson, jackie kennedy, and the casket
. that was to die was told the entire kennedy family. >> guest: that was the rumor. with the exception of jackie onassis who voted for john anderson. >> host: up, did she? >> guest: president carter actually told me a story about his speech at the john f. kennedy assassination. jackie kennedy was very cold to have. that was when he first realized that he did not just have a problem with ted kennedy. yet a problem with the entire kennedy problem and there were a big client. >> host: what should readers come away from your book with and what is the legacy? >> guest: essentially i think it is important to realize that a tragedy like the assassination has created more out of the presidency of john f. kennedy then we read in the historical record. that is the power of people in democracy that is one of the altman legacies of his short time in the white house. >> that was book tv signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators, and others familiar with their material. airing every weekend on book tv at 10:00 p.m. on sa
of the jfk library and jackie kennedy was very cold to him according to president carter at that event and that is when he first realized he didn't just have a problem with ted kennedy but a problem with the entire family and they were a big clan. in just a few seconds what should the readers come away from the book and what is the legacy of john kennedy? >> guest: i think it's important to realize that a tragedy like the assassination has created more out of the presidency of john f. kennedy than we actually read in the historical record and that is the power of people in a democracy. that is one of the ultimate legacies of john f. kennedy's short time in the white house. >> host: thank you very much for the interview. >> guest: you're welcome. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which offers of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their material. speaking of an heiress on the tv to 10 p.m. saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch online. go to booktv.or
you? >> guest: no. and what was so amazing in "jackie oh!," i interviewed one of president kennedy's best friend, senator george smathers from florida, and i worked very, very hard to get the interview. at first he said no, and i kept writing them and calling him and finally the secretary i think felt sorry for me, and he agreed to see me. and i went to his law office. the interview was set for 11:00, and i arrived at 10:45, and i waited until 1:45. when he walked out, he said, hello. i'm on my way to the hill. i'm so sorry i can't talk now. maybe one of these days. and i kept trying, and finally the secretary said, all right, do you want lunch with him or do you want the end of the day with him? and you know, that's -- it's a tough one to decide. finally, i said i will come in at the end of the day. i had an extraordinary interview with him, in that he talked very openly about president kennedy and his private life. and at one point in the interview, he was talking about john f. kennedy sexually, how he made love. he described him as a rooster sitting on top of the in. and before
in this was jackie kennedy. because she comes back from dallas on the evening of the 22nd of november and already she was beginning to think, you know jack has only had two years and ten months, he's been robbed of the ability to be thought of as a great president. she literally began thinking about what the library should look like. talked to arthur schlesinger about writing his book and she had this feeling that since he had been robbed of the opportunity to write memoirs and do other things to defend himself she would have to go into the breach. and for someone who was not an historian and had not been particularly converse sant with american history, that was almost a full-time thing for her for the next year. >> rose: i'm struck by her-- and i know from jill-- the idea about william manchester's book. did she -- reportedly did not read it for a number of years. >> she didn't read it until after she had gone to court to prevent its publication. >> rose: finally read it. >> she read it and pronounced it fascinating. and it is. >> rose: we mentioned as i sat down two big speeches, the civil rights
jackie onassis, jacqueline kennedy, looked down at her for being involved in politics, it was not lady-like, and certainly among first ladies of asia during that time, the idea of this woman with a gun and speak her mind regardless of what the men were saying, and even tell the president to shut up, was something really shocking, not just to asian but the world in a way, and yet there she was, sort of blabbering her ideas without any sense of inhibition. >> before madame nhu there was madame shanclek. she was well-opinion and had a feeling for what americans and americans were looking for in a first lady, and madame nhu didn't have that. i think madame nhu would have looked for her place in the world but there was no role model no shoes for her to step into. so she had to blunder her way through it, and the dynamic with the kennedy family and the nor family in saying gone is fascinating. two catholic families, family regimes, jfk and his family, and diem and his family, and then madame nhu, this first lady and jackie kennedy in the white house. and in these interviews, jackie is asked
. bob schieffer speaks with clint hill, jackie kennedy's lead secret service agent in 1963. he is the author of "mrs. kennedy and made." e." the programs are brought to you as a public service on c- span. the rebroadcast of the shows begin today at 1 p.m. eastern with abc's "this week." state of the union. listen to them all on c-span radio on 90.1 fm here in the washington dc area. across the country on xm satellite radio, find is on channel 120. download our free app for smart phone or listen online at c-span radio.org. to haveught it was fun a little view of history of a time in america that wasn't instructional. that was a little bit more a little and actually bit more archaeological meaning random. you take a look at them and you see bunches of weird photos and then the captions explaining. i had a vision of high school students flipping through them and loving history if they flipped through it. >> i also understand how you admire the pandas at the zoo. >> yes, they are darling current it was important for her to support her husband terence just her being there would brin
to close with >> we are going to close with jackie kennedy's voice one more time. it talks about her white house years. >> once you are in the white house, i felt like i could get out. as strong as the white house can , it was getting me down a little bit. go up to new york or go see your sister in italy? it was for a sad reason this year. he thought i was getting pressed after losing patrick did -- after losing patrick. i thought, i can go out. i can go to a restaurant in new york or and antique shop. i used to worry about going into the rock -- into the white house. it was really the happiest time of my life. going to the white house and she found out they were the happiest times of her life. sheere is the case where had a much different impact as first lady. may not have been the ones that people thought about at the time. >> you suggest she was a transformational first lady and set the stage where those to follow. how so? >> away her generation was a bridge between traditional wives and mothers and the post women's liberation of the modern era. ast is exactly how she was first lady. th
of them. he owned a portrait of jackie kennedy and a painting which i think it's hilarious because they were famous people. but they understood what rockwell was about and they also understood realism and that there is tremendous emotion involved in the act of looking. and i really don't think that any artist looked harder than rockwell to be at his work is all about the act of looking. i often got disgusted with him because verbally he wasn't very forthcoming. every date that he gives is long and now you can check things online because you can look at the census records. any time i checked it was wrong and when i realized i look i stopped criticizing for that because as a biographer you don't want to be the party cooper. you can't keep doing that again and again. you can do it once or twice. but he loved telling and using stories and i don't -- on for the right conversation. i think that he -- his work didn't lie. it was incredibly moving in the deep. so, there's something in this book that i think -- i don't know if anyone will even notice it. i will say critically as he wrote a
and the paintings he owned a portrait of jackie kennedy and a painting of santa claus which i think is hilarious because they were famous people but artists bought it and they also understand realism and that there is a tremendous emotion involved in the act of looking. and i really don't think that any artist ever worked harder than rockwell. his work is all about the act. i often got disgusted with him working on this book because he wasn't very forthcoming. with the dates he was terrible. every data that he gets this wrong. you could get passenger records and any time that i checked it was wrong. when i revived to be very biased by that i stopped criticizing that because it's tiresome for the reader. you don't want to be the party pooper this is you were not in the navy. you can't keep doing that again and again. you can do it once or twice. but he loves telling them using stories and i don't think that he placed a high premium on forthright conversations. i think that he expressed himself through his work. his work didn't lie. his work is incredibly moving and deep. not all of it but some of
of credit. we know jackie coined the term the week after president kennedy's assassination in the famous interview. but it's rose who has that kind of loyalty conflict going with the family and making them such a beautiful presence on the world stage in the american stage. she helped jackie had the material to work with it seems to me. i would call her perhaps the mother of camelot and jackie was the queen. >> host: when john kennedy was assassinated and not whole image system kind of came crashing down, how did she handle that? >> guest: anyone can imagine just how horrible that would eat to lose a child to that kind of violence. >> host: after losing show. >> guest: the apple of her eye, joe junior. cake has been taken in a plane crash in 1948. so rose is literally seen her children almost in earth order disappeared from the scene. not only that, but 1964, rose wrote in her journal, and this is unusual for her because she usually try to be positive and optimistic. this would've been in the summer of 64, just after his assassination. she writes about what it's like that summer and she s
. and a confident of bobby kennedy and jackie. here are a few examples. of carter i think he wrote his intelligence will carry him to sensible solutions, but he seems to be a humorless ungenerous cold eyed and crafty and possibly vindictive man. i would prefer him to humphrey. he referred to president reagan as old ron and predicted the term when he was reelected. he said tottering around in his 70s i would guess he would be in the do nothing eisenhower model. he corresponded with clinton and wrote about the whitewater scandal. he told president clinton i am sure that you will learn valuable lessons from this ordeal as jfk learned from the bay of pigs. later he faced more pressure surrounding the lewinsky scandal. he offered this advice. this is to restore bit clinton's credibility as a president and a man. he was a critic of john boehner before he became speaker. he misquoted him. i am sorry to see them give this forgery new currency. do you really think those quotations sound like abraham lincoln. come o. those are a fraction of fascinating writing of a true insider. they have been published in a
of the united states. three years into his one and only presidential term. president kennedy's funeral was marveled that after another assassinated president. abraham lincoln. the protocal was chose by his widow. the casket was drawn by horses down pennsylvania avenue to the capitol building where jackie, caroline and john jr. were waiting. john jr. famously saluted his father. a symbolic force to st. matthew's cathedral where funeral services were held. president kennedy was buried in arlington national cemetery where an eternal flame burns apt his grave site. question, what is the legacy of the kennedy presidency? >> john was young, made for the television age. had a wonderful sense of humor. he was an inspirational figure. what sered the soul of america was us watching the horrible way he died. the race to the hospital. taken in the casket to washington, d.c. the whole funeral and shooting of oswald on that sunday. that impressed upon us what kennedy was. there would not have been a camelot had there not been dallas. after that, if you want to separate out the record of the man and
at that time like he was invulnerable. he was so great looking. the presidently going well. jackie sitting beside him. suddenly rifle shots and america changed profoundly. we went back to the kind of older -- lyndon johnson taking the oval office and the kennedy administration was over. >> jon: you remember the transformation that bobby kennedy underwent after that assassination. i was very young when bobby kennedy and martin luther king were assassinated. i remember those events vividly. the defining moments i remember as a kid and there was taunting in there but mostly the assassinations. >> i think no one made a more impressive transmission midstream than bobby kennedy. he was jack kennedy's enforcer, his closer counselor, a tough guy behind the scenes. it was always bobby putting his finger in somebody's chest. obviously in 1968 because of war and civil rights movement and social consciousness that could you see develop on the fly almost he became the most interesting politician after this year. >> jon: when you are talking to people who were down there, as you speak to them, are their
sources that the entire kennedy family in 1980 voted for ronald reagan. >> guest: yes, that was the rumor expenditure exception of jackie voting for john anderson. >> host: did she really? that's interesting. >> guest: president carter had a story of the speech of the dedication of the john f. ken library, and jackie was coupled to him, according to president carter, at that event, and he realized he didn't have a problem with ted kennedy, but a problem with the entire kennedy problem, and they were a big clan. >> host: in a few seconds, what could readers come away from the book with, and what's the legacy of john kennedy in a few seconds? >> guest: essentially, it's important to realize that a tragedy like the assassination has created more out of the presidency of john f. kennedy than we read in the historical record, and that's the power of people in a democracy. maybe that's one of the ultimate legacies of john f. kennedy's short time in the white house. >> host: very nice, larry. >> guest: thank you, craig, thank you for a great interview. >> host: yeah, you bet, terrific.
one and only presidential term. president kennedy's state funeral was modeled after that of another assassinated president. abraham lincoln. the president's flag draped casket was drawn by horses down pennsylvania avenue from the capitol building to the white house where wife jackie and son john jr. was waiting. john jr. saluted his father in a heartbreaking moment. the family walks with a military escort. the funeral service was held at the cathedral. president kennedy was buried at the arlington cemetery where the eternal flame burns. question, what was the legacy of the kennedy presidency? pat buchanan? >> well john f. kennedy was young, charismatic, made for the television age. a wonderful sense of humor, an inspirational figure. i think what seared the soul of america for all of us watching the horrible way he die and the race to the hospital and taking the casket to washington dc and then the whole funeral and the shooting of oswald on that sunday, and what it did, i think, is that impressed upon us what kennedy was. there would not have been a camelot had there not been dalla
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